Underwater headphone

Google ‘does Bluetooth work under water’ I get the following “Bluetooth does not work underwater. In fact, none of the wireless connectivities work under the water. The law of physics prevents it to do so.”

So be aware, how do you intend to use it – open ear wireless bone conduction headset ($89). For someone who walks in the pool, or do breaststrokes with their heads in the air, this device works, continuously.

1. When submerge, the connection is lost – can’t listening to books or news, but music, if you don’t mind the on again and off again.

2. I’m a lap swimmer (free style), breathe every four stokes on my right side. This turns out to be a little blessing because when I breathe, the right side (with the 3 buttons – receiver) surface hence reconnects again, however briefly.

3. The volume is low even I adjust to the fullest. It competes with the open space and other chatting walkers in the pool.

4. When I standing still and put my left (dummy side) into water while the right side remains in the air, the sound quality is ok, shutting out the chatters and the noise from my own strokes… which brings me to think, if the manufacturers design a new device with two dummy earphones, and putting the receiver high above the head/water, maybe this will work for swimmers or when submerge in the water.

5. I can’t do the flip turns now – it will fly off my head. I can’t push too hard off the walls – fly off too. Can’t jump into the pool…

Found my list toy [愉快]

失而复得的痛和乐

昨天丢的. 想充电时才发现
电话去 回答 “没有”[凋谢]

俺物理不灵光 水是绝缘体 (?)
新鲜期一过 毛病就浮出水面
水下无声
轻易掉: 不能翻身 也不能太用力推墙
小心翼翼的 慢慢的 … 还游啥泳呢?

今天游完 很开心 虽然不够快. 但能在20分钟 (20:57[捂脸])之内完成1,000 yard 还是开心🥳

心灵鸡汤 难怪运动员们 天天游 日日练的 [偷笑]

临走时 到前台试试运气
“有没有人…”
还没有问完 金发女伸手拿给俺

是喜是忧 只有俺自己知道 [捂脸]
听书是不行 只能断断续续听🎵
下代的水下🎧会不会攻克这盲点?

我有一个好主意喔[调皮] I’ve an idea 💡

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The Sixth Man, 2019


The Sixth Man (2019) by Andre Iguodala (1984-).

I picked this book randomly, without knowing who he is. His diction keeps me going. Then the stories. He raised many valid points and the writing is good (with Carvell Wallace (1974-).

不知道他是何方神圣 就开始听,也真够大妈的.
开始听下去是他的声音好听
然后
内容好

这本书和前不久 擅嘴巴/打脸王的自传 Will (2021) 都有一个特点: 严厉的外婆+注重教育的妈. (题外话: 爸爸都去哪儿了?)

很少留意🏀. 迈克尔·乔丹退休后 更是没了任何兴趣. Iguodala的书值得看/听 是他非常明确体系.
大学运动员要不要或者应不应该有收入,一直是个争论点. 他坦坦荡荡的阐述他的观点.
我听完后 看了些书评. 很多人说他的回忆录是关于种族. 不完全同意:也可能他善于隐藏? 比如他说 🎾 ⛳️ ⚾️ 🏒️ 可以随心所欲转职业 但是??🏈就不可以… 但没有中学大学的体育 🏀 他会不会也有今日? A问题好大 留给大人物吧 🤣

Chris Mullin (1963-) 是我们当地的🏀名人. 好像安居乐业在我们隔壁村 🇮🇪人堆. 时不时会撞见他. 一次他坐在我旁边. 大妈刚想问他 他就走开了. 大概是聪明😂

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The tallest and shortest

John Isner (1985-; 2007; $20m; 6’10″/2.08m) and Jack Sock (1992-; 2011; $11m; 6’3″/1.91m) are playing Santiago González (1983-; 2001; $2m; 6’3″) & Édouard Roger Vasselin (1983-; 2002; $6m; 6’2″) for the final. The prize money is $426,010, which is good (singles are $1,231,245).

Isner’s nickname is little tree. This is the first time I see him playing doubles. Sock isn’t a small guy but next to Isner, he looks like a kid. Reilly Opelka (1993-; 2015; $3m; 6’11″/2.11m) is another American who’s an inch taller than Isner. Here are a few visibly memorable photos by the nets, two are Diego Schwartzman (1992-; 2010; $11m; 5’7″), I saw on Facebook:

 

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Nadal vs Alcaraz

The second semi of Indian Wells is Rafael Nadal (1986-; 2001; $127m) vs Carols Alcaraz Garfia (2003-; 2018; $2.207m). Two years after Nadal turned pro did Alcaraz was born: two generations play each other. 

Can’t say I’m a fan because he represents brute force than finesse. And he grunts, however lightly. But he seldom if at all loses his temper on court, don’t remember seeing him smashes his racket or argues with the chair empire. 

During this tourney, Osaka (1997-; 2013; $20m) broke down again when someone, one spectator, called out “Naomi, you suck!” during her losing match to Veronika Kudermetova. She wanted that fan to be removed. Gosh. …  Mommy I want milk 🥛Mental toughness is part of the game, isn’t? Nadal says “We make money. And even if it is terrible to hear that … we need to be prepared for that.” 

A sensible thing to say. Thank you. Who doesn’t need mental toughness to accomplish anything? Can Serena collect 23 slams and Nadal 21 without their mental strength?  

🥛 妈妈我要喝奶

 心理韧性是人生的一部分. 不仅仅是运动员.
🇩🇪的 Boris Becker 说过 🎾第五局不是在打网球了 打的是心理战.

幼稚可笑 [呲牙]

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indian Wells Masters 2022


Indian Wells Masters (BNP Paribas), Apr 3-20.

Taylor Fritz defeated Russian Andrey Rublev 7-5 & 6-4 in the first semi match. The second is Nadal vs Alcaraz. I saw Fritz at US Open last year but didn’t much because my suddenly famous dad came and the whole section came to live.

The organizer avoids to display Russian flag. Audience is polite and there is no boos, unlike what Venue and Serena experienced in 2001. It left such traumatizing or agonizing feeling that Serena didn’t play there for the next 14 years.

整整一年没有碰过🎾了
简直不是人过的日子
只能看看 解解馋 [吃瓜]

红衣少年有点像 Tom Cruise 或者 那谁谁谁 (?) [偷笑]
年纪大 记不住
Taylor Fritz 赢了半决赛
去年🇺🇸网看他时 6⃣️ 犹爸来了
热闹非凡 简直没人看球了
孝敬他的🥟 包子都被陌生妞们秒扫光了 [偷笑]

4⃣️ 红衣哥打赢 Rublev 一个不讨人厌的🇷🇺. 主办方连人家的国旗也免了 够糟糕的.
喊话贼眉鼠眼
快下台吧
看看你的臣民的处境. 观众还公平 没有人boo 嘘 一 好多年前 同一个地点 大小威的待遇可没有这么幸运 被嘘到 小威一气之下 14没有去打. 觉得那是明目张胆的种族 [弱]

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The end of a very controversial game

Photo courtesy: Guo Jian   

Beijing winter Olympic is over, China collected her most gold in a winter game: 9, ranking 3rd, one spot ahead of USA. NYT terms it the joyless spectacle (2022.2.20). WSJ “highlight its divisions” and “never do it again.”

Sui Wenjing and Han Cong’s performance, reportedly, was excellent. 👍 I just watched Anna Shcherbakova who won the gold on Youtube: she’s so beautiful, and couldn’t believe my eyes that not a single teammate congratulated her and everyone was consulting the little drug user: Anna’s Russian, isn’t she, for Pete’s sake?

 

Photoshopped? I don’t think she would do it.

奥运结束 🇨🇳最成功的冬季 👏🏻 奖牌赢排名第三 (🇺🇸小四; 女🏒️又输给了🇨🇦 😹).

新闻报道常规. 几乎被其它劲闻淹没: 谷娃娃转国和2金一银; 八娃妈和链; 🇷🇺 吃药娃和金牌; 贼眉鼠眼普京和乌克兰… 哦御 鹅的天啊 [捂脸] 明明是属于俺北京的二个多星期的荣誉和光芒 结果…

老贼也太不识相了 习大大的大爬他竟然敢集军闹事炒蹭热度 (阻扰🇺🇦加入北约)真不厚道. 听说大大还给刚刚赏了他一个1000亿美元能源协议… 这哪里是朋友呀!?

今天BBC报道 乌克兰🇺🇦总统跑去慕尼黑(享受起立鼓掌)捶胸顿足 指天画地的要求加入NATO北约…

蛋痛 蛋痛 蛋痛 [呲牙]

刚刚看了 灰姑娘Anna Shcherbakova [强] 比那个吃药 💊的漂亮多了 … 有没有看到她赢了金牌后没有队友祝贺她 [捂脸] 简直了

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The doping teen from Russia

The Russian gold medalist Anna Shcherbakova (2004-)

The Russians went to Beijing Olympics under the ROC banner (Russian Olympic Committee), a shell corporation for Russia due to drug scandal (csce.govIn 2016, Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov blew the whistle on Russia’s state-run doping program,…). One would think that they’ve learned something … Then the scandal of figure skater Kamila Valieva (2006-) tested positive for trimetazidine on Christmas Day, Dec. 25, at her country’s 2022 Figure Skating Championships in Saint Petersburg, became known AFTER she helped to secure the Russian team gold medal.

Lonesome Dove

The scandalous decision to allow her to continue, not only angered the average spectators/couch potatoes like me but her fellow figure skaters as well: Tara Lipinski ( gold 1998) and  and Johnny Weir condemn the decision; Kristi Yamaguchi (1971; gold medal in 1992) weighted in, said she began to compete at age of 13 and managed it well.

Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that because of her age – 15, is protected and would suffer “irreparable harm” if not letting her to compete. What kind of bullshit is this? IF she wants world glory and decided to compete with adult, then she is under the same rules as everyone else, regardless in age.

In the end, the druggie teen lost, so did World Anti-Doping Agency WaDa and Court of Arbitration for Sport.

… and more …

One FB user wrote: “… Anna Shcherbakova delivered extraordinary performances placing first place in the women’s competition. At the completion of the event no one was embracing her. No one was congratulating her. No one was rejoicing with her. She awkwardly stood silent, alone and seemingly lost while her coaches abandoned her to console her distraught teammates. Just plain insanity. She just won a gold medal! …”

I watched her on Youtube, found her to be very beautiful and, it was a pleasure to watch her skate. …

Sorry have to ask, is she clean?

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Beijing Winter Olympics 2022

Kamila Valieva (2006-)


A very controversial Olympics (XXIV, Feb 4-20) to say the least.

91 nations with nearly 3,000 athletes in 109 events in 7 sports. The slogan is Together for a Shared Future 一起向未来 and it was opened by president Xi Jinping.

Russians go there under ROC banner because their old doping scandal. Why would they be allowed to compete in the first place?

  1. How many people are still watching the Olympics nowadays?
  2. 11 countries diplomatic boycott the game, incl. US, UK, Canada and Australia, Taiwan, …
  3. the covid-19 pandemic or Omicron is still raging …
  4. Putin of Russia is about to invade Ukraine
  5. The athletes switching their alliances, high profile such as Eileen Gu and massive foreign athletes playing for the Chinese ice hockey teams
  6. A mother of eight in Xuzhou is chained by her neckMrs. Xi for real or made up by wishful thinking netizens.
  7. Credit Suisse revealed: unmasks criminals, fraudster and corrupt politicians 

The winter games? Seem the least interesting subject. And the bad judges … “Who’s f***ing judge?” fumes Fanny Smith of Switzerland. 

 

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Eileen Gu, the freeskier

Changing nationality is one of this winter Olympics 2022‘s big topics, because Eileen Gu.

  • The Economist: Cold Warrior – why Eileen Gu ditched Team USA to ski for China.
  • Yaboo: Gu and the repercussions of renouncing U.S. citizenship

Freeski star Eileen Gu’s delicate balancing act between China and the U.S. | espn Feb 1, 2022

  • … it’s hard not to see opportunism in it.
  • Gu speaks often of her humanitarian vision of inspiring girls. But her reticence to speak out about topics like Peng’s disappearance, …

Eileen Gu, who is expected to win three gold medals in Beijing, chose to represent China instead of the U.S. when she was 15.

EILEEN GU THRUSTS her fists into the sky, ski poles dangling from her wrists, as she skis to a stop at the base of the Dew Tour halfpipe in Copper Mountain, Colorado. Her second-run score of 96 flashes on the outdoor monitor and the small crowd gathered on this bitter December morning erupts in support. Gu leads the event by nearly three points but isn’t the type to take a victory lap, so on her third and final run, she attempts a right corked 1080 — a trick she has yet to land in competition — and comes up a few degrees short. “I was really proud of my second run and wanted to step it up,” Gu says after the contest. “I know I’ll get the 10 next time.”

The win is Gu’s third in 13 days, in the third of five finals in four disciplines in which she will compete over a two-week span. After this morning’s halfpipe win, she will rest, grab lunch and finish second in slopestyle. Twenty-four hours later, she’ll take third and win “best trick” in street style, a rail-jam-style contest that requires hiking a small park.
Gu is, without debate, the most dominant woman in freeskiing, and she’s one of the only athletes in the sport who’s won major international titles in all three Olympic disciplines: big air, slopestyle and halfpipe. In Beijing, the 18-year-old California native is a favorite to win gold in all three. But she will do so while competing for China.

Born in San Francisco to a Chinese mother and American father and raised by her mother and maternal grandmother, Gu announced in June 2019, at age 15, that she would switch country affiliations and compete for China in the Beijing Games. “This was an incredibly tough decision for me to make,” Gu wrote in an Instagram post at the time. “The opportunity to help inspire millions of young people where my mom was born, during the 2022 Beijing Olympic Winter Games is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to help to promote the sport I love. Through skiing, I hope to unite people, promote common understanding, create communication, and forge friendships between nations.”
The announcement came as a surprise to many in the sport. It is rare for a top U.S. athlete to switch countries, and rarer still for a U.S. citizen to acquire a Chinese passport. Many questioned whether Gu, a high school sophomore at the time, understood the impact of her decision. She was called a traitor on social media and accused of making the choice for financial gain and allowing herself to be used as a political tool by the Chinese government.
Through her agent, Gu declined to comment for this story and has never confirmed whether she renounced her American passport. But the International Olympic Committee requires athletes to hold passports for the countries they represent, and China does not recognize dual citizenship.
Gu often says when she is “in the U.S., I’m American and when I’m in China, I’m Chinese.” Now, she will drop into her first Winter Olympics at a fraught moment in U.S.-China relations and as China comes under increasing international criticism for its human rights practices. Deftly navigating her two worlds can be incredibly lucrative. But the stakes are high.
While she progresses freeskiing with innovative tricks, she must temper her fearlessness when the contests end. In China, athletes are expected to perform well and remain silent. But in the U.S., athletes are asked to have opinions on everything from vaccine mandates to media censorship to human rights. Toeing the line between those two cultures requires Gu to have as much air awareness in interviews and on social media as she does when performing her limit-pushing skills, and mistakes can be just as costly.
WHEN BEIJING FIRST hosted the Olympics, in 2008, protests erupted over China’s policies in Tibet and the African nation of Sudan, where China supported a government accused of waging a genocide in its Darfur region. The protests interrupted nearly every stop of the 21-city torch relay. Even then-IOC president Jacques Rogge called on Beijing officials to respect their “moral engagement” to improve human rights in the nation. The international community believed then that the Games could usher in a new era of democracy and free speech in China.
Nearly 14 years later, China has been condemned by the U.S. government and other nations for its repressive policies in Xinjiang, Hong Kong and Tibet. In December, the Biden administration announced a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Games over China’s use of forced labor and detention camps to suppress Uyghur Muslims in the western Chinese province of Xinjiang, as well as other human rights abuses.
Calls for an outright boycott of the Games heightened after the Women’s Tennis Association, which is based in Florida, suspended all tournaments in China after Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai, a three-time Olympian, disappeared from public view. She had accused a high-ranking former government official of sexual abuse on social media, which Chinese censors immediately scrubbed from the internet.
Peng’s post was unprecedented in a country where celebrities keenly understand the cost of speaking out or stepping out of line. “Chinese athletes, film stars and musicians must keep silent,” says Chinese human rights activist Teng Biao, a lawyer and visiting scholar at Hunter College. “They know if they criticize the party, they will lose everything. And the loss is so huge that they won’t take the risk.”
The Chinese government has signaled that it will also not tolerate protests from foreign athletes during the Games. In mid-January, a member of China’s Olympic organizing committee warned athletes against saying anything that is “against the Olympic spirit, especially against Chinese laws and regulations,” and warned that doing so could result in punishment. International human rights groups have advised athletes to remain silent while in Beijing, and to not expect the IOC to protect them if they find themselves in trouble with the Chinese government. Sport organizers in the U.S. also warned athletes who are headed to Beijing not to say anything that could be considered controversial before or during the Games.
“We can’t speak out about anything important, which is really B.S.,” says two-time Olympic snowboard gold medalist Jamie Anderson, who is competing in slopestyle and big air in Beijing.
For all these reasons, athletes have found themselves in a difficult situation in the lead-up to the Games. Most U.S. athletes have spent the past several months avoiding directly answering questions regarding China’s human rights abuses for fear of losing sponsors or being blocked from entering the country. But a misstep by a U.S. athlete in Beijing comes with a level of protection by the U.S. consulate, which would work to get them out of the country if they were detained. As a Chinese citizen, Gu could be pulled from competition, forced to surrender her passport or be prevented from leaving the country.
“Competing as a Chinese national removes any potential diplomatic protections others might have as a foreigner in China,” says Sarah Cook, research director for China at Freedom House, a D.C.-based nonprofit that conducts research and advocacy on political freedom and human rights. “If she gets into any kind of trouble, she doesn’t have that protection.”
Gu is also subject to the ever-changing whims of her government at an incredibly sensitive time in Beijing. Infractions that might at other times pass as small missteps could be magnified disproportionately during the Olympics. “China is not a rule of law society,” Cook says. “Even if you think you are staying on the safe side of the red lines, the rules are arbitrary, and the lines are constantly moving.
“Say Eileen meets Lady Gaga,” Cook adds. “And Lady Gaga was photographed meeting the Dalai Lama [six] years ago and someone decides that crosses the line. It’s hard to know how far they will go in their control. It can be so arbitrary.”
Self-censorship is nothing new for Chinese athletes. But because Gu has a foot in both worlds, she is subject to conflicting cultural pressures and expectations. She appeals to American and Chinese fans alike and undergoes media scrutiny in both countries. That’s rare for even the most famous Chinese athletes, like Peng, who spend their careers virtually unknown in the U.S.
Gu’s need to carefully control her narrative has restricted her interactions with U.S. media and limited how her sponsors promote her in the U.S. Typically, a breakout star would be introducing herself to the world in Olympic preview stories and ad campaigns. Snowboarder Chloe Kim, another Asian-American athlete who could have competed for her parents’ home nation, did media in two languages in the U.S. and South Korea ahead of her first Olympics in Pyeongchang. But Gu remains conspicuously absent in major U.S. media except in beauty and fashion columns where she is not expected to answer questions about sensitive geopolitical topics.
At the Dew Tour, Gu was available to the media only briefly after her contests, and her reps requested questions be limited to her sport. In the rare instances she’s faced questions about China’s human rights record, she has declined to comment. Her sponsors, too, are reticent to speak on the record. Red Bull and Oakley declined to be interviewed for this story, and after The Wall Street Journal inquired about a story on Red Bull’s website that mentioned Gu had indeed given up her U.S. passport, the passage disappeared from the story without explanation.
IN COPPER, GU steps down from the podium and a throng of media, competitors and fans rush toward her. Two men working event security appear at her shoulders and guide her through a gate leading away from the halfpipe. As they reach the entrance, two fans dressed in ski gear stop her and ask to take selfies. “Of course,” Gu says, as she tilts her head in the direction of their iPhone cameras and smiles.
“I can’t believe I met Eileen Gu,” Robert Chai, 29, says to his friend as she walks away. Born in Beijing, Chai lives in Seattle and came to Copper for a ski weekend with friends who are also Chinese. When they heard Gu was competing, they made a point to wake up early and attend her contest. “I heard about her when she started to be a champion,” Chai says. “She skis well and is also really pretty. She’s a dream girl for guys in China now.”
Gu began skiing at 3, when her mom, Yan, enrolled her for lessons at a school in Lake Tahoe. Wanting to keep her daughter safe from the high-speed crashes of downhill racing, Yan eventually signed her up for the freeski team with little understanding she would one day watch her throw tricks over 75-foot gaps. Like with most things she attempts, Gu — who ran cross country in high school, graduated in three years and earned a near-perfect 1580 on her SAT — showed an aptitude for freeskiing. She was a quick study, able to visualize and learn complicated tricks in the halfpipe and terrain park. Known for spinning equally well in both directions, a key to earning high scores at contests, Gu’s runs include tricks no other woman has done, including a double cork 1440, which she competed for the first time in a big air contest last year.
Gu also is undeniably marketable. She speaks with equal poise and conviction in English and Mandarin, which is all the more impressive because of her flawless Beijing accent. She is one of the tallest women in the sport, at 5-foot-9, and skis with long, elegant lines. She is confident in a way that comes off more earnest than cocky, and her telegenic beauty translates even when she’s competing in a helmet and goggles.
Gu competed on the U.S. rookie team for about a year before she approached her coaches in early 2019 to ask for permission to switch nations. Unlike athletes who change country affiliations in order to make the Olympics, Gu was a standout who was expected to qualify for the U.S. team. U.S. Freeski & Snowboard head coach Mike Jankowski says the coaching staff made a case to Gu and her mother for why she should stay, but they also told Gu they would never stand in her way. “We have a ton of respect for her decision and supported her 100 percent,” Jankowski says. “To be able to honor her heritage in that way is really cool.”
Since joining Team China, Gu’s image has been ubiquitous on the walls of Chinese sporting goods stores and in subway and bus stop advertisements in Beijing. She has earned an elite roster of sponsors there, including tech giant JD.com, dairy producer China Mengniu Dairy and Anta Sports, the third-largest sporting goods retailer in the world. In spring 2021, a few months after she became the first X Games rookie to win three medals, Anta launched its “Keep Moving” campaign with a one-minute video featuring Gu. A budding model in China, Gu has also been featured in ad campaigns for Louis Vuitton and Victoria’s Secret, fronted covers of Chinese editions of Vogue, Cosmopolitan and InStyle, and attended Paris Fashion week at the invitation of a Chinese brand.
Gu speaks often of her humanitarian vision of inspiring girls. But her reticence to speak out about topics like Peng’s disappearance, or to acknowledge the commercial opportunities her decision has given her, has caused her peers to question her motivation.
“There’s no question she’s an extreme, remarkable talent and I’ve really enjoyed watching her progress the sport,” says freeski pioneer Kristi Leskinen, who lobbied for women’s freeskiing to be included in the X Games and Olympics. “But it’s conflicting, and I don’t envy her position. On one hand, she almost certainly wouldn’t be the athlete she is today without being born, raised and trained in America. But it’s equally difficult to imagine she’d have anywhere near the recognition, sponsorship deals or resources if she hadn’t chosen to represent China. So, while she often cites inspiration as her motivation, for some it’s hard not to see opportunism in it. Especially at a time when the WTA is suspending its events in China out of fear for a female athlete’s safety.”
WHEN THE IOC granted Beijing the 2022 Olympic Games in 2015, China announced an ambitious plan to build 800 ski resorts by 2022 and get 300 million people on skis. Like most Olympic host countries, China also began pouring billions of dollars into the development of winter-sport athletes with medal potential. China has earned only 13 gold medals since it began competing in the Winter Games in 1980, and in 2018 speedskater Wu Dajing won China’s only gold. Gu could triple China’s 2018 haul on her own.
When she arrived in Beijing in January to begin training for the Games, Gu, who also goes by her Chinese name Gu Ailing, posted a photo of her eating dumplings to her Weibo account, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, and received thousands of comments of support within a day. For some Chinese fans, like Chai and his friends in Copper, Gu’s decision to switch countries signifies a global power shift away from U.S. dominance and sparks intense national pride.
“Eileen appreciates the Chinese culture and the upbringing of her mother,” Chai says. “She was born here in the States, but she chose to compete for China. That’s super rewarding for us. If she wins a gold medal, she will be one of the best athletes in China, the same as Yao Ming.”
For the next few weeks, Gu’s every move will be monitored by the Chinese government and scrutinized by American and Chinese fans. And what she doesn’t say will be heard as loudly as what she does.
“Eileen is already the biggest thing in China,” says Misra Noto Torniainen, Gu’s personal coach and the former coach of the Swiss freeski team. “She is super talented, but she also works every day as much as she can, whatever she does. If it’s modeling, studying, skiing, she gives 100 percent. I see big things coming. She opens up new boundaries and can break into new markets.”
But as the Peng situation has highlighted, a gold medal will not afford Gu the ability to speak freely even after the Games. In the fall, she plans to attend her mother’s alma mater, Stanford University, where she has expressed interest in studying international relations, public policy or journalism. And while the Olympic spotlight will fade, Gu’s decision to represent China will impact the rest of her life.
“It’s very difficult for a 15-year-old to understand what it means to become a Chinese citizen,” Teng says. “She will have to practice censorship for all of her life.”

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Lake Morey, VT

After skipping in 2021, and a postponement, the pond hockey tournament is finally underway this weekend. Whiskey Jack Daniel’s is a prominent sponsor. The local news WCAX in Fairlee has a segment on them.

Friday and Saturday’s weather is cloudy and pretty nasty. Sunday is a better day, sunny and mild.

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